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is a 28-will blog your -- 28- year-old logger -- blogger from egypt. the city offered him refuge for one year. the idea was to give him some breathing room and time to feel safe again. his first impressions involved pigeons like these. >> it is not like this in egypt. pigeons do not just come and sit on your hand. in egypt, birds are wary of humans. poles are not like the egyptians are. i have never seen anything like this there. >> a polish club is letting him use an apartment in this district in the west of the city. he updates his blog from her thoswho n speak arabic and read what he writes soon begin to understand why he faces problems back home. this afternoon, his message is stark -- islam poses a threat to humanity. especially in the west, a fear of islam should be a normal reaction, just like the fear of falling under the wheels of a moving train. >> that is what i think. i am an atheist. in egypt, everything has become worse under the muslim brotherhood. as far as i'm concerned, there is no moderate isl osama bin laden was the true face of islam. >> surely the situation in egypt
and -- cities visited by local custom vehicles go to c-span.org / local content. >> you're watching book tv on c-span2. here is our prime-time lineup for tonight. visit c-span.org for more on this weekend's television schedule. >> international financial diplomat william rhodes talks about the current economic and financial challenges facing the economies of europe, japan, china, and south korea. next on book tv. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> okay. first of all, it is great to be back. we enjoyed our relationship that way. tokyo has been the headquarters of our asia-pacific operations for 25 years now. we enjoy a terrific relationship and a lot of different ways. one of my colleagues who is with me, doug peterson who just joined us from the city, and he is setting up. we welcome you, doug. dougie is all over the world. as such, he has lived quite a bit of time in japan himself. it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see. in terms of this whole notion of the book, by the way, a very modest title, banker to the world. when i heard of this, and i am a very close, pers
, 1666. okay. . and global news, average home prices in china's 100 biggest cities was 1% in january from december. and it marks the eighth consecutive marketing rise. two other surveys show growth was weak and the economists caution the country could set a tradeback if trade or government weaken. >> we're here for a lot of reasons, but one thing we need to talk about for an advertising, guys, is there anything better to tuz on than the super bowl? >> no. and it's gotten more important. ite become the academy awards of advertising. first of all, viewership is up. about 111 million people will watch it. crisis is up more than 7%. >> more people watch the laugh time or the gain 12347. >> yes. >> i always thought that was when everybody went to the bathroom. >>. >> you go to the kitchen, you get a drink, you do all sorts of things during halftime. >> $3.75 million for a 30-second spot. people have paid over $4 million. price of ads is up 60% over the last decade. they're also sold out almost a half a billion dollars of ads spend for this super bowl. there will be about 78 advertisers. and i
are now rediscovering their identity. >> home to a population of more than 1 million, the city is situated on the turkey -- turkish/i iraqi border. it is the unofficial capital of turkey. but it was not always. between the many minuets that make up the skyline are a few church towers. 100 years ago, it was mainly inhabited by armenians. these days, most of the church as they build are mere ruins. for this insurance salesman, these ruins are symbolic. as far as the authorities are concerned, he is turkish, and yet, he identifies as armenian. he is a descendant of survivors of the armenian massacre almost 100 years ago. >> how does a rundown, desecrated place such as this one makes you feel? >> to me, it represents a great tragedy. back then, people were told that they were being deported. but on the way, most of them were murdered. it was genocide, no question. members of my own family were among the victims. >> early in the first world war, around 1 million armenians were persecuted and killed by ottoman forces. public discussion of this chapter in history was taboo in turkey for decades.
city. within hours, police identified her as sierra, a 33-year-old mother of two, a native of staten island, new york. sierra had been missing more than a week, after disappearing during what was supposed to be her first foreign vacation. turkish police suspect she's been murdered. >> it has been determined she was killed with a blow to the head. for us to give concrete details of the case, we need more time to investigate. it's not right to say anything about the ongoing interrogation of the detained people. she was a tourist traveling alone. >> these are the last known images of sierra, security cameras caught her on the night of january 20th, walking alone inside a shopping mall. sierra flew from new york to turkey on january 7th solo, because a friend cancelled coming along at the last minute. she was an amateur photographer who shared her photos of istanbul's mosques and skyline with friends she met on instagram. sierra is believed to have met some of these instagram acquaintances during her stay in turkey and during a short side trip to amsterdam. sierra's husband steven sounde
. these not going to affect mass shootings. >> most people die in this country in gun violence, which is inner city -- >> but there's no constituency for that. >> there's a huge constituency for that. every mayor in america would like that. if you're going to have a comprehensive solution, you're going to have to deal with mental health. you can talk about video games. joe's going to need to deal with guns. maybe universal background check has a realistic chance of passing in congress. maybe we should be talking about that as well. >> maybe i am just a -- i don't know. sad, angry person here, but i don't believe that we're going to get something comprehensive that deals with assault weapons and background checks and mental health and everything else. you're going to have to choose, pick your spots. >> no, but that's part of the issue i think that's going to unfold in the off-year elections. john again is right. there is broad support here for things like universal background checks. in fact, you know, i think approval approach 90% as a pollster, we never see anything sort of much above 80%, 90%. br
at the scene in midland city, alabama. what's the latest? >> reporter: no resolution as the hostage standoff goes into a fifth afternoon. however, authorities say they are in constant communication with 65-year-old jimmy lee dykes communicating through the pvc pipe that provides ventilation from the surface to his underground bunker. authorities say they have no reason to believe that any physical harm has come to the 5-year-old hostage. listen. >> mr. dykes, through our communications we've been able to -- he's told us that he's got an electric heater and some blankets inside and he's taking care of him. he's also allowed us to provide coloring books medication toys. >> reporter: and the sheriff goes on to say i want to thank him for taking care of our child, that is very important. the 5-year-old boy was abducted from this school bus that you're looking at in this video tuesday afternoon. that's when the abduction occurred. witnesses say a gunman came on board the bus demanding hodges and shot the driver when the school bus driver tried to confront the gunman. charles poland jr. that schoo
york city, ed koch. he will be warmly remembered. president bill clinton will be speaking there at the funeral today. the mayor who famously asked everybody, how am i doing all across the city. he was really beloved by a bipartisan gathering of new yorkers i would say and today he will be remembered at temple emanuel at new york city. that will be quite a service i would imagine there. >> there are so many ed koch stories to go around. the "new york post" the other day answered his famous line with a front page that said, you did great. he was a beloved mayor of new york city. martha: yeah, indeed he was and he is being remembered right now. more on that later. gregg, thank you for being with us today. >> my pleasure. martha: we'll see you back here tomorrow and "happening now" starts right now. jenna: right now we have brand new stories and breaking news. >> the little boy at the center of the hostage drama, tense negotiations to get him free and the high-tech surveillance equipment now helping investigators. >>> also the troop drawdown in afghanistan. new reaction from i
by colleagues is with me, doug peterson, who just joined us from citi, and he is heading up standard & poor's ratings, and we welcome you, doug. and doug has lived with citi all over the world and as such as lived quite a bit of time in japan itself. so it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see, in terms of this whole notion of the book, you know, by the way, it's a very modest title, banker to the world. [laughter] you know, when i heard of this -- and i'm a very close personal friend of bill's, like everybody in this room is, and so when testifies talking to me about this -- when he was talking to me about this concept of what he wanted to write about, lessons of debt cry cease and all of this, i just knew that it was right in our sweet spot in what we needed to be able to do. so we were able to convince him, and so now i'm not talking to you as his friend, i'm talking to you as his publisher. [laughter] and we had this decision, you know, we were going to do this book, and we kid. and we did. now, the ink wasn't even dry on this book when henry kissinger came out and sai
cities or places that are more neutral to it. it is certainly hard to prejudge the outcome of these talks. the foreign minister at a security conference in munich over the weekend was making positive noises about what could be achieved in the new obama administration, the second term you about it is ultimately the supreme leader who calls the shots. certainly the fact that iran told the u.n. nuclear watchdog last week it was going to be deploying a significant number of second generation centrifuges that can spin uranium three times as fast as ones currently used is not a sign of stepping back, jenna. it is certainly a sign of moving quickly along. there are some experts who think that actually more rigorous, intensive, sustained negotiations at this point will be more useful than sanctions. then there are different opinions at this point about this point of no return. some say it his iran has enough fissile materiel it could make a nuclear warhead. and that would be this summer by many estimates. others are saying that red line point is when iran can do that but do it in a way that is un
back marcus allen and his take on concussions and kids in the sport and the clash in the crescent city. president obama shifting focus back to the economy after encouraging economic news friday. >> home prices are starting to climb again and car sales at a five-year high. manufacturing is roaring back. the business created 2.2 million jobs last year and our economy created more jobs than econom t economists originally thought. >> jones industrial average closed about 14,000 on friday, the highest since 2007. the los angeles mayor has put an end to speculation that he will be joining the obama cabinet. there is talk he might be transportation secretary. he said he will finish out his term as mayor. in massachusetts, former senator scott brown said he will not be running for the senate seat vacated by john kerry, but there is speculation that brown could have his eye on the governor's seat when patrick steps down in 2014. we will take you to boston to big deeper into that story later in the show. a whole lot to get to first. vice president biden is in germany and talking international s
this -- cities like chicago with very strict gun control laws don't have less crime than the communities surrounding them and we also know that as ownership of firearms has expanded in our country the country has -- the crime has declined. the famous socioologyist, he had written an article pointing out in our rush to worry about firearms getting in the hands of people who shouldn't have them, we also were likely to step on the rights of people who had every right in the world to get them and his point was between half a million and two million instances a year a firearm is credited with stopping an act of violence and if we restrain the people's detroit have firearms we will restrain the ability to protect themselves. >> greta: what is a reasonable restriction? someone may be perfectly normal today but a year from now maybe that person isn't perfectly normal. what would you see as reasonable restrict,. >> we do have because of privacy laws some states cannot provide the data about mentally ill people to be added into the database when we check for firearm sales. if anybody is under any
in getting things done? >> well, walter was an internationalist first class. the expanded the city banks in italy over -- is a great friend of japan. used to go to japan regularly, and i think he, along with paul volcker on the public sector side, where major mentors of mind. and so i think it's fair to say, and you've seen this, that walter was the greatest thinker of his age. and that's what citi is going back to i think at this point in time. we have a lot of present citi bankers, former citibank offers who i know will agree with me. but as far as, you, working with walter come easily got me involved in all of this, and john reed later on, were both i think significant world financial leaders. as far as having talked to a lot of people, i think meeting monday look, having dealt with a number of cases, spend our in 1980 with ago castro. he wanted my advice on how to restructure the cuban debt. and i can speak to you about that because we nationalize in cuba, one of the first things we did was nationalize the foreign banks. then he walks on our resource. we're kind of even here. certain
the hour your fox news minute. former new york city mayor ed koch has died, he brought the city of near bankruptcy in 1970s and all for the 1980s. the outspoken native new yorker became a national figure with his enthusiastic and often combative personality. he died of heart failure in manhattan. mayor koch was 80. in china of the highway collapsed sending 2 dozen vehicles plummeting more than one hundred feet. the official chinese news agency reporting nine people are confirmed dead. in turkey two are dead after an explosion and the u.s. embassy in ankara. homicide bomber expected--believed to be from a marxist extremists groups that explosives at a side entrance checkpoint killing himself, a turkish security guard and injuring a female turkish journalists. military sources tell fox news estate at this time. those are your headlines. connell: we will stay with that topic here and look at you oil market with tension in the middle east and the bombing in turkey outside the u.s. embassy worth $98 for crude oil although i will point out oil has been going that mostly on optimism about glob
failure. he was 88 years old. koch led new york city for 12 years, known for saving the city from financial ruin. michael bloomberg saying in a statement the city has lost an icon. a cheerleader, champion, 5,000-word oh bit in the "times" today, words like pugnacious, tenacious, outspoken. david, you know his story pretty well. he really did set the stage for giuliani to change the city. >> yeah, he was the consummate new yorker. of course, living in his apartment not far from here, in greenwich village for so many years. not everybody in the community, but many would say, our mayor. when he came into the office in '78, the city was at or near its nader. i can remember it well at that time, of course. and we did grow a great deal under his mayorality. not without some scandal, but certainly with a great deal of enthusiasm. in many ways he brought the spirit back and made you feel good about being a new yorker. which is not easy to do, when you had lived through the '70s. >> he passes on a day where a new biography, a film biography of him opens. something somebody said is the koch
at this one place in the city can you actually claim asylum. the police take only 20 claims a week. this selection process has been described as arbitrary. the police say it has improved. we were ordered to leave before it took place. queuing andrants 200 lead and once per week, that is a one in 10 chance. it does not stop people from coming. we ask to speak to the minister and to the police spokesperson about the allegations of mistreatment. at about the deficiencies of the system. the greek government declined our request. the director -- they directed us to speak to this woman, the head of the new asylum service. --2011, the greek government it pledged to change. it is two years on from the judgment and still we find out, 300 asylum seekers in the freezing cold lying on the ground, 20 people only selected. that cannot be right. said, this is one of the problems. we are gearing up for that. we are recruiting many people. we expect to have up boards of 250 new staff members for the asylum service. this is a very big investment. >> for muhammed and things like him, she has this mes
because it happened very quickly without a single fire shot. we know what happened next. out into the city they went. this is where it gets quite fascinating. once they came out of the airport, somewhere down around here, look at all of the art rarelies that they could have gone to. if you think about it, just driving 30 miles per hour in five minutes they could have been beyond that radius in almost any direction, wolf. it's been an extraordinary story of how they were organized, the whole thing from beginning to end took about 11 minutes and then they were gone without a trace. they found a burned out vehicle that they think is connected to this but they don't know if it was the direction they went or anything else. the bottom line is, the diamonds are gone. if you want a sense of what $50 million in diamonds looks like, take a look at this. this bag has half a million small diamonds in it. if you want to have $50 million worth of diamonds, what you have to have is that many bags full of diamonds like that. so it's an extraordinary robbery but getting rid of it, wolf, will be the real ch
oklahoma city, oklahoma on february 6, 2013. in libt of his past travel difficulties, we ask mr. long be granted the same right. despite that letter he was barred from returning to qatar. he now remains in oklahoma away from his wife, daughter and livelihood. he has never been told by any u.s. authority that his name is on the no fly list nor has he been charged officially with any crimes. he simply been told he can't go home. joining us now, the u.s. air force veteran who joins us from oklahoma city because he was unable to fly here. and can't join us on set. gentlemen, good to have you here. can you tell me, i'm curious about your story. you were in the air force. i think you joined when you were 18 or 19 years old. how did you fine your way to islam? >> well, when i was stationed in turkey i met two individuals, one of whom worked with me and another one who worked a different office on the base, and they used to present, you know, they would pass out booklets and pamphlets to those of us who were serving there and that's how basically i was introduced to it. >> and you converted w
of the u.s., it is cricket city. 37 in kansas city with clouds. 31 in minneapolis. and back out west we go, rain in seattle. and it, look like partly cloudy skies for much of central and southern california. now, what about travel? what can you expect today as you head out to the airways? at a couple of the airports, you could see some delays. minor delays delays expected in new york. the mix of travels. a mix of rain and is snow in spots lot of cleveland. there you go, guys. let's send it back to you in new york. >> reynolds, we were just talking about sorkin on the best dressed list and you may not be on it, but this is the guy that might replace it. loot him. >> thank you so much. >> you know what? i think he knew he was going to be back on squawk today. it's been a while and you said i'm going to be back on "squawk box." >> got the pocket square going. >> representing. >> and the hair is high .tight today, too, right? when was that done, yesterday? >> high and tight. my dad, god rest his soul, was a high and tight man. >> do you miss us on the days on -- >> every day. a day without "sq
in 19 of 20 cities measured that is the best calendar year since 2000 five. let's head back to liz claman at the cme for the second part of her exclusive interview with acting treasury secretary neil wolin and find out what he has to say about too big to fail. liz? liz: i can tell you this, everybody at treasury agrees, including neil wolin, the acting treasury secretary. there is no taste for a bailout like we saw four years ago with aig and the other problems. he is was one of the architects of dodd-frank of the he worked on it very hard. there are people who say it doesn't do enough. there are other people like attorneys general from 11 states including oklahoma who last week was on fox business says it gives treasury too much power. i began asking him does dodd-frank truly eliminate keeping us the taxpayer on the hook from too big to fail banks? >> the statute made clear once and for all, taxpayers will not be on the hook for dealing with failed financial institutions. it creates the statute does, a whole process which the owners of those firms, management of those firms have t
's office, attorney general eric holder, to just in my city alone, the city of houston, to report 15 voter abuse cases. without the preclearance where would we be? or the proposal to eliminate the independent school district board of trustees, over a school district that has worked hard to survive, will be subjected to the preclearance to determine whether not only the students will be denied their right to learn in a school district they love and is fighting for their education, but that elected persons will be denied the right to serve and others denied the right to vote for them. the voting rights act protects all voters. it gives them all the right to vote, one vote one person. shelby county has raised the issue they should not be subjected to preclearance. they are beyond that. the district court, federal court decided in washington, d.c., that they were wrong. that preclearance is constitutional. and we know that well because about -- because when we had the privilege of re-authorizing section 5 in 2006, building on the leadership of my predecessor, the honorable barbara jordan, who
than the annual salary. the city of london, seen as a major loser in this deal. it has an estimated 150,000 staff potentially affected and i just have to say, i keep thinking i'm missing something on this story because if this actually happens, ross, the impact would be -- it would have a major impact on the city, especially at the top. what does it mean for the banks? what does it mean for the potential returns when you look at comp and return on investment for, you know, return investment capital for some of these financial names? >> look, if you're freezing pay bonuses at one times salary, which for the investment bank is quite a dramatic change, what will the reaction be? obviously, a lot of people leaving banks or you'll see -- which i suspect you'll also get an awful lot of complex pay deals coming up. >> that, too. >> and there's a lot of ways to try and get around it. >> credit suisse and some are trying to pay with derivatives. there may be different kinds of comp. but if you're talking about the best and the most talented, you could argue about that in the banking sector alway
message from north korea as an official video. it shows what appears to be a u.s. city under attack. the story behind this ... coming up. copd makes it hard to breathe, but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking advair. if you're still having difficulty breathing, ask your doctor if including advair could help improve your lung function. get your first full prescription free and save on refills at advaircopd.com. [ male announcer ] when it comes to the financial obstacles military families face, we
of philadelphia, but in realty, if you can't cover the whole city and can't do a lot of things, that one s.w.a.t. team can never be decisive. that's where we found ourselves, that began the significant evolution. that's where we really began to change dramatically. >> right. in sew maul wrau -- somalia task force ranger was there before the big battle i wrote about and during that battle they launched six mission. the pace was intelligence gathering, finding targets and planning, operations, sometimes very quickly once that intelligence came together and launching a raid. describe how, what optempo means and exactly how that applied in iraq? >> that is very interesting, mark got it exactly right. a series of raids in mogadishu all happened a number about raids days apart. you get intel. make a decision. you set yourself criteria to launch. when those criteria come you launch but it is a pretty centralized and pretty deliberate process. when we got in iraq we were originally doing that and we would have this precise thing. what we found we were having effect, but very narrow effect, very sl
. jenna: elizabeth prann is live in midland city, alabama, where she is covering the story since it first broke a week ago. elizabeth, take us if you would to the scene of the crime. what is happening there now? >> well, we can see officials are still combing through the scene behind us. by all accounts this was a very many could plex and a very sensitive situation. in fact bomb technicians were on site earlier this morning. we learned from the fbi. they are confirming there was a camera inside the bunker. they were speaking with jimmy lee dykes through a pipe as well as the cell phone. they witnessed the suspect's deterioration and they acted as he continued to get agitated. officials think that dykes was killed by law enforcement. fbi officials contacted us directly. they say they're processing the scene. they will send a review board that will later release the details about the shooting death of dykes. we've heard multiple questions about the drone surveillance. fbi said that military was not involved. the drone circling overhead was in fact from law enforcement. jenna. jenna: tomorro
. if somebody applied in the, to the mexico city u.s. embassy in january of 2007, and someone else crossed the border and is here in january of 2008, we all agree that the person who waited in line in 2007 should be able to get that green card before the person in 2008. we have to figure out how to do that so it's not an interminalably long period of time, that people are old or dead before they become. at the same time we have to make sure that this principle is kept because that helps us pass a bill. one other point i would make. we made two exceptions to that. dick durbin worked very hard on the dream act. we all agreed that should get special priority. >> young people born here as children? >> yeah. second we'll need something special for agriculture because it is a different situation. virtually whether you're in new york dairy country or arizona ranching country you can't get americans to do this kind of work. >> we're about to get the hook. my penultimate question, senator mccain, have you talked to speaker boehner about this? >> no but i did hear this statement a couple days ago wh
to school. that did not happen in new york city. that is a different culture. that is what bill clinton was warning barack obama about. be careful because these people really care about their culture and their life and what they do. they care about different things than you do. part of it is cultural. when you ask somebody, or one of your leaders, you ask about the nra, we are viewed as an advocacy organization that stands up for gun owners and the second amendment. that is about 12%. the rest goes to competition, a gun safety, technical information, and a lot of our research goes into boy scouts, girl scout, bringing people into the shooting sport and teaching them to handle guns safely. there are fewer gun accidents today than there were at the beginning of the 20th century but there are a lot more guns. the only people out there teaching gun safety and training people is the national rifle association. i have got to go. [laughter] i have to go but i will take you to a gun show. [captioning performed by the national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite co
to the other side of the city. [laughter] second, i started to pay special attention to the plaques on the buildings that recommend -- that recognize the united states of america for lending a hand in rebuilding. i was proud. the marshall plan, imf, and other organizations led by the united states are evidence of our ability to make the right decisions at the right time, taking risks today in the interest of tomorrow. we now face a similar crossroads. we can be complacent or competitive as markets bloom in every corner of the world. with or without us. we could be there to help plant the seeds or we can see the power to others. given the chance to lead a second great american century, we must not just look to the american landscape today. look at the days to come. we must marshal the courage that define the the marshall plan so that we might secure in the future freedom. let's remember the principles of jefferson's time. looking to independence echoing in our time. interest istional in leading strongly and it still in doers in this world. let me leave you with a thought. when traged
's from huffington post. to bonnie, let's go to our republican line next, to nicholas in new york city. nicholas, welcome. >> caller: well, it's great to be here, and thank you, and i'll try to make it brief, and let me apologize to the others waiting on line. i just, very quickly, you know, i came here as a child in 1966, and they moved us up to the bronx. we came here through red cross auspices. and, you know, my dad and mom worked two and three jobs, eventually they bought real estate because they saved their money. we were subsistence farmers back home -- >> host: nicholas, where -- where was back home? you said you came here in '66. where was back home? >> caller: montenegro today on border of albanian on the coast of adriatic sea. we were albanian catholics. in fact, we were a minority amongst other minorities, but we were the minority. >> host: back to our question, how do you think these budget cuts will affect you? >> guest: well, i've been watching this thing, and it seems like i've seen this movie before. now, i've worked very hard as my mom and daddied, as my brothers do, a
Search Results 0 to 45 of about 46 (some duplicates have been removed)